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Newkirk Wallcovering and Painting

Installing Vinyl Replacement Windows

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

Removing old window

Here we have a picture window that is original to this 1950's Sears and Roebuck house. After years of putting up with constant drafts, the owner decided to replace these heat sieves with new vinyl replacement windows. With this particular window, the owner made a smart choice and requested a window that could be opened to be put in. He decided on one that had a slider on either end that could be slid towards the middle and allow ventilation in the spring and summer.

Our installers are actually taking the window out from the exterior of the house to avoid repainting and touching up the interior. You can see the putty knife they wedged in (picture to right) to help pry out the window after having chiseled out the wood frame.

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos



vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

Removing old window

This particular window was lodged in pretty good. Here we have a couple more pictures of the removal process. I guess the old windows didn't want to leave without putting up a little bit of a fight.

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

Removing old window

Et voila, the old picture window removed and headed for an unceremonious rendezvous with the city dump. Good riddance! Our installer displays an impressive feat of strength by precariously balancing the window on one thigh. Nice job!

To the right, I'm pointing to where the installers chiseled off the original stop and part of the frame to make room for the replacement window. These replacement windows are often manufactured about 1/4" smaller than the original on the top and sides so that they can fit into the window opening. The existing interior trim (window jamb) will bridge any distance between the opening and the new window. On the exterior, the added insulation and the aluminum facing will cover any gap between the new window and the opening.

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

Installing vinyl replacement window

Out with the old and in with the new. Our installers just put the new window in directly from the exterior. After some measurements to ensure a proper fit, these windows just screwed right in. Prior to putting it in, they placed a piece of fiberglass insulation on top of the window to fit between the top of the window and the header. You may be able to notice the sliding windows that are part of this picture window.

When you interview potential contractors to do this job, you can really benefit from asking their opinions on what options you have for a particular window. I took several estimates and only one of the salesman suggested going with a sliding type window here instead of a nonopening picture window. I didn't even realize that I had the option until he suggested it. He also suggested a casement window over the kitchen sink for easy opening and closing. My installers even commented on the wise choice.

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

Caulking around replacement window

To the left, after seating the window and screwing it in, the next step is to caulk the entire interior of the window to fill in any gaps and prevent air intrusion. From the exterior, the installers insulated the remaining sides of the window, caulked it, and fit an aluminum framing to border the window. To the right, you'll see another window without the exterior finished. Notice the gap between the window and the frame.

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

Removing screens and storm windows

To the left, you can see the installer removing the original screen and storm window unit that was just screwed into place. This appeared to come together as just one unit. After years of use, the storms just rattled back and forth on windy days and did little to prevent the influx of cold air and moisture. To the right, you'll see the installer chiseling out the stop and part of the frame of the original window in order to make room for the vinyl replacement window.

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

Hauling old windows to a proper burial

To the left, you see the old windows being hauled off to the dump or maybe they can be put to better use as part of somebody's playhouse or tree fort. Come to think of it, I should have donated a couple to my neighbor for his kid's treehouse. They may have performed slightly better than just the empty openings they now use as windows.

To the right, you'll see the casement window installed over the kitchen sink (the casement window cranks open to a full 90 degrees for easy cleaning and catching a nice breeze). I hate to even put the wood blinds back up. Sunlight just floods through this opening now, especially since we removed the awning that overhung the original window (I like not having the grids on this one). You talk about making a room seem inviting and bigger than it actually is. Consider opening it up by removing the morbid awnings. I've got one more awning to remove over a rear entry door. Whoever thought that these things were such a great idea anyway?

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

Finished product - Polaris Ultraweld replacement window

Here are a couple more interior shots of the views from the finished product. I'll add a couple shots of the finished exterior windows later. Nothing like a new and clean window either. Now I'll probably be spoiled and have to clean these suckers on a monthly basis. Thank god, they just flip out for easy cleaning.

A few other notes - I got full screens on all the windows and the built in grids on most. I can't believe others sell the tack on grids. Avoid those like the plague. These are also the low E argon gas windows (Polaris Ultraweld windows). The difference between these and the original windows is night and day. These windows also come with the security lock feature - allowing you to leave the windows a few inches open without too much fear of someone being able to open it further, although I doubt they would stand up to a crowbar or the like.

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

vinyl_replacement_windows_photos

Finished product -exterior view

Here's a picture of the finished vinyl replacement window after the aluminum facing has been installed and the caulking finished. This is the same window that you will see above where I took a picture before the exterior work was done. The installers added insulation, installed the aluminum facing and caulked her off. Now I'm waiting for another deep freeze to really test their energy efficiency, but it will probably warm up and stay warm now.















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